Forget Islands - Own Your Own Planet

Potentially Habitable Exoplanets – Forget Islands… Own Your Own Planet

There are people who dream of buying their own island. Understandable… they’re childish.

How about going to the next level and buying your own planet?

With some advances in space travel this may actually be possible some day. For the moment you can settle with the ownership of discovered exoplanets. Choose whichever you wish from the list below 🙂

Teegarden’s Star b

Teegarden’s Star b (also known as Teegarden b) is an exoplanet found orbiting within the habitable zone of Teegarden’s Star, an M-type red dwarf around 12 light years away from the Solar System. Together with Teegarden’s Star c, GJ 1061 c, d, Luyten b and Tau Ceti e, it is the fourth-closest potentially habitable exoplanet as of April 2020.

Stats:

Discovery date: June 2019

Orbital period: 4.91 days

Star: Teegarden’s Star

Mass: 1.05 M Earth

Temperature: 301 K (28 °C).

TOI 700 d

TOI 700 d is a near-Earth-sized exoplanet, likely rocky, orbiting within the habitable zone of the red dwarf TOI 700, the outermost planet within the system. It is located roughly 101.4 light-years (31.1 pc) away from Earth in the constellation of Dorado. The exoplanet is the first Earth-sized exoplanet in the habitable zone discovered by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS).

Stats:

Discovery date: 3 January 2020

Orbital period: 37.4260 days

Star: TOI 700

Mass: 1.72 M Earth

Temperature: 268.8 K (−4.3 °C; 24.2 °F).

K2-72e

K2-72e (also known by its EPIC designation EPIC 206209135.04), is a confirmed exoplanet, likely rocky, orbiting within the habitable zone of the red dwarf star K2-72, the outermost of four such planets discovered in the system by NASA’s Kepler spacecraft on its “Second Light” mission. It is located about 217.1 light-years (66.56 parsecs, or nearly 2.0538×1015 km) away from Earth in the constellation of Aquarius. The exoplanet was found by using the transit method, in which the dimming effect that a planet causes as it crosses in front of its star is measured.

Stats:

Discovery date: July 18, 2016

Orbital period: 24.159 days

Star: K2-72

Mass: ~2.21 M Earth

Temperature: 261.15 K (−12.00 °C; 10.40 °F).

TRAPPIST-1d

TRAPPIST-1d, also designated as 2MASS J23062928-0502285 d, is a small exoplanet (about 30% the mass of the earth), which orbits on the inner edge of the habitable zone of the ultracool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1 approximately 40 light-years (12.1 parsecs, or nearly 3.7336×1014 km) away from Earth in the constellation of Aquarius. The exoplanet was found by using the transit method, in which the dimming effect that a planet causes as it crosses in front of its star is measured. The first signs of the planet were announced in 2016, but it wasn’t until the following years that more information concerning the probable nature of the planet was obtained. TRAPPIST-1d is the least massive planet of the system and is likely to have a compact hydrogen-poor atmosphere similar to Venus, Earth, or Mars. It receives just 4.3% more sunlight than Earth, placing it on the inner edge of the habitable zone. It has about <5% of its mass as a volatile layer, which could consist of atmosphere, oceans, and/or ice layers. Recent studies by the University of Washington have concluded that TRAPPIST-1d might be a Venus-like exoplanet with an uninhabitable atmosphere.

Stats:

Discovery date: May 2, 2016

Orbital period: 4.049959 days

Star: TRAPPIST-1

Mass: 0.297 M Earth

Temperature: 282.1 ± 4.0 K (8.95 ± 4.00 °C; 48.11 ± 7.20 °F).

Kepler-1649c

Kepler-1649c is an Earth-sized exoplanet, likely rocky, orbiting within the habitable zone of the red dwarf star Kepler-1649, the outermost planet of the planetary system discovered by Kepler’s space telescope. It is located about 301 light-years (92 pc) away from Earth, in the constellation of Cygnus.

Stats:

Discovery date: 15 April 2020

Orbital period: 19.5352551 days

Star: Kepler-1649

Mass: 1.2 M Earth

Temperature: 234 K (−39 °C; −38 °F).

Proxima Centauri b

Proxima Centauri b (or Proxima b[3]) is an exoplanet orbiting in the habitable zone of the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri, which is the closest star to the Sun and part of the triple star system Alpha Centauri. It is approximately 4.2 ly from Earth in the constellation Centaurus, making it and Proxima c the closest known exoplanets to the Solar System.

Stats:

Discovery date: 24 August 2016

Orbital period: 11.184 days

Star: Proxima Centauri

Mass: 1.173 M Earth

Temperature: 234 K (−39 °C; −38 °F).

Gliese 1061 d

Gliese 1061 d (also known as GJ 1061 d) is a potentially habitable exoplanet largely orbiting within the limits of the conservative defined habitable zone of its parent red dwarf star.

Stats:

Discovery date: 13 August 2019

Orbital period: 13.031 days

Star: Gliese 1061

Mass: 1.68 M Earth

Temperature: ???.

Gliese 1061 c

Gliese 1061 c (also known as GJ 1061 c) is a potentially habitable exoplanet orbiting within the limits of the optimistic defined habitable zone of its red dwarf parent star.

Stats:

Discovery date: 13 August 2019

Orbital period: 6.689 days

Star: Gliese 1061

Mass: 1.75 M Earth

Temperature: ???.

Ross 128 b

Ross 128 b is a confirmed Earth-sized exoplanet, likely rocky, orbiting within the inner habitable zone of the red dwarf Ross 128, at a distance of about 11 light-years from Earth. The exoplanet was found using a decade’s worth of radial velocity data using the European Southern Observatory’s HARPS spectrograph (High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher) at the La Silla Observatory in Chile.

Stats:

Discovery date: November 15th 2017

Orbital period: 9.8658 days

Star: Ross 128

Mass: 1.8 M Earth

Temperature: 213–301 K (−60–28 °C; −76–82 °F).

Luyten b

Luyten b (more commonly known as Gliese 273b) is a confirmed exoplanet, likely rocky, orbiting within the habitable zone of the nearby red dwarf Luyten’s Star. It is one of the most Earth-like planets ever found and is the fifth-closest potentially habitable exoplanet known, at a distance of 12.2 light-years.

Stats:

Discovery date: 17 March 2017

Orbital period: 18.6498 days

Star: Luyten’s Star

Mass: 2.89 M Earth

Temperature: 259 K (−14 °C; 7 °F).

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